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Category - Medical Malpractice

Top Surgical Errors that Lead to Malpractice

Top Surgical Errors that Lead to Malpractice

Every surgery comes with risks. No matter how major or minor a procedure is, a careless mistake could cost you your health and even your life. As a patient, you are entitled to expect a certain standard of care from healthcare practitioners, especially doctors, during risky procedures like surgeries. If you think that your healthcare providers have shirked their duties in offering you the highest standard of care, we at Dezao Law can help you build a case for medical malpractice. The Most Common Surgical Errors You Must Know Surgical errors are defined as preventable mistakes during surgeries. These go beyond the known risks of surgery that patients consent to before their procedures. Some of the top surgical errors that lead to medical malpractice are: Wrong Site Surgery This refers to surgical procedures performed on the wrong body part or organ. You might think that this doesn’t often happen, but there are a fair number of cases where patients have had the wrong limb removed or amputated. If your healthcare providers performed surgery on the wrong body part or organ, you have a right to file a medical malpractice suit. Leaving Surgical Instruments in the Body This careless mistake has happened to more people than you think. In fact, to prevent this surgical error, hospitals require healthcare providers to count all medical instruments used before and after their procedures. Leaving surgical instruments in the body can cause grave complications. Infections, punctured organs, and even death are some of the risks that come with this blunder. Administering Known Allergens to Patients Healthcare practitioners need to always take note of their...
The Five Deadliest Pharmaceutical Injury Cases You Have Ever Seen

The Five Deadliest Pharmaceutical Injury Cases You Have Ever Seen

The pharmaceutical industry should be responsible for ensuring the health and safety of the individuals they claim to serve. After all, they are tasked with the discovery, development, and manufacturing of medications meant to make your life better. However, reality often paints quite a different picture. The industry entrusted with safeguarding the health of people all around the world has shifted its priority. Their thirst for profits, gains, and innovation has spurred the creation of various drugs that may serve the purpose they promised, but often have grave side-effects that cost people their lives. As a regular consumer of products from the pharmaceutical industry, you have the right to seek damages if you think that certain medications you have consumed have compromised your health. We are experts on pharmaceutical-based medical malpractice here at Dezao Law. Do not hesitate to contact us today if you need experienced and expert attorneys on your side. Deadliest Pharmaceutical Lawsuits over the Years There have been a lot of pharmaceutical injury cases through the years, but there are certain deadly cases that have changed the game when it comes to suing pharmaceutical companies. Here are five of the deadliest pharmaceutical injury cases in history:    Cerivastatin (Baycol) In 2001, Bayer AG recalled Baycol after 4 years on the market. Baycol was a prescribed drug that treated high cholesterol. However, research linked this drug to the development of rhabdomyolysis—a muscle disorder that clogs the kidneys with proteins from deteriorating muscle tissues. It was reportedly responsible for 52 deaths and has totaled $1.2 billion in litigation-related damages.    Yasmin Yasmin is another one of Bayer’s products that has...
The Misdiagnosis Epidemic: What You Need to Know

The Misdiagnosis Epidemic: What You Need to Know

12 million Americans are misdiagnosed each year. If you’re feeling tired, nauseous, and or have less energy than usual, you may have the flu, anemia, or maybe something even more severe. But, which one is it? It is now widely known that doctors can sometimes misdiagnose their patients. What you should know is that it may happen more often than we think. Although they have their medical degrees, and a lot of experience, they don’t always perform up to par. Read more to find out why doctors are having trouble properly diagnosing their patients, and what you need to know in order to make sure it doesn’t happen to you: Training Gap Although doctors are thoroughly trained in identifying certain symptoms, they do not know everything. Doctors have never been trained to treat the causation of illness, and have just been focusing on writing prescriptions to combat symptoms. A part of this unfortunate gap is that doctors are unwilling to direct the relevant patient to the correct specialist for proper prognosis. Also, due to the time constraints that come with running a practice, doctors will have a stronger inclination to find a quick fix, instead of finding real causes. Difficult Patients It may be hard to believe, but doctors are more likely to misdiagnose a patient if they are more difficult to deal with. A recent study has shown that if someone is a patient who is aggressive or difficult toward the relevant doctor, they will be 42 percent more likely to be misdiagnosed. This is a shocking and sobering statistic. Patients may also have a strong urge to...
5 Tips for Finding a Good Medical Malpractice Lawyer

5 Tips for Finding a Good Medical Malpractice Lawyer

200,000. That’s the estimated number of patients who die each year in the U.S. alone due to medical malpractice. Unfortunately, as it is a common situation in the country, you should have an experienced medical malpractice lawyer by your side just in case a doctor does not do their work correctly.     Here are 5 tips for finding a good medical malpractice lawyer that would be of great assistance to you if you are treated in a negligent or careless way.   Get referrals.     Find out if you personally know someone who can point you in the right direction. Get as many referrals as possible.  This way, you have wide room to navigate when you will start to narrow down your options.   Narrow down your options to about three or four names.     To effectively do this, there are some general things that you can look into before you set an appointment with them. Track record, of course, is the most important. Find out if the law firm has extensive experience in handling medical malpractice cases or if the lawyer is a member of associations that deal with personal injuries. If you are up to it, you can even check the state bar association website to see the lawyer’s standing.  Online reviews are helpful as well.   Once you have three or four names, you can schedule a face-to-face meeting.     Ask about the duration of the case and the cost of their legal services. You should be extra keen about the lawyer’s capacity to be upfront with their fees as well as...
New Jersey Medical Clinic Shut Down Due to High Infection Rates is Open Again

New Jersey Medical Clinic Shut Down Due to High Infection Rates is Open Again

The Osteo Relief Institute, a medical clinic specializing in knee pain in Wall Township, was shut down by state health officials on March 7 but was back in operation two weeks later. Thirty-eight patients were infected by injections, reports NJ.com. This instance is just a small part of hundreds of thousands of infections patients suffer when they obtain medical care across the country. Monmouth County Health Department officials found that employees weren’t properly washing their hands and allowed full needles to sit “well before” they were used on patients. After a re-inspection, the clinic re-opened. The state confirmed 38 reported cases of infections due to injections but an investigation continues. The problem of infections caused by health care providers is well known and widespread. Results of the HAI (Hospital Acquired Infections) Prevalence Survey were published in 2014, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It reports that an estimated 722,000 infections occurred in U.S. acute care hospitals and about 75,000 patients with HAI’s died during their hospitalizations in 2011. As the Osteo Relief case shows, the problem isn’t limited to hospitals. The CDC also states that in the past ten years more than thirty outbreaks of hepatitis B and C in non-hospital healthcare settings occurred in outpatient clinics, dialysis centers and long-term care facilities. Often infections can spread between medical facilities. Patients infected in hospitals may be transferred to rehabilitation facilities or nursing homes where infections spread to other patients and residents. Infections in skilled nursing facilities can make their way to hospitals if an infected resident is transferred to a hospital. While many infections can be dealt with...
More exhausted residents = more dead patients?

More exhausted residents = more dead patients?

Think you work long hours? Medical residents, those who have graduated medical school and are working in hospitals to get hands-on experience, can currently work up to 16 hours a shift. The private group overseeing physician training in the country is proposing that it be increased to 28 hours, reports the Los Angeles Times. That may mean exhausted residents treating patients in New Jersey hospitals in the future. Have you ever been awake for more than 24 hours? If so, how well did you function? Do you think you would be able to make life-and-death decisions after being awake that long or perform a medical procedure without making mistakes? The 16-hour limit was a reduction in 2011 from 24 hours, after evidence showed exhausted residents were endangering both their patients and themselves. Studies show the longer residents work, the more likely they are to make potentially deadly errors when caring for patients. Nearly 20% of residents at the University of California Los Angeles stated in a 2007 survey that they had fallen asleep while driving, because of work-related fatigue. Doctors who want the increase claim that current shift limits may endanger patients by forcing residents to leave at critical times and that the grueling hours are preparation for the future, when they will be unsupervised. This training is compared to getting ready for a marathon. “With enough experience comes resilience and the ability to perform under expected, sometimes challenging conditions,” Thomas Nasca, chief executive of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, stated when announcing the proposed change. The proposal is rightly coming under criticism from both physicians and...
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